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Maternal and perinatal outcomes of uterine rupture in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo

Published on: 20th October, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8691249258

Introduction: Uterine rupture is one of the peripartum complications, which cause nearly about one out of thirteen maternal deaths. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of mortality among women with uterine rupture in referral hospitals of Lubumbashi, in the south east part of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods: Institution based cross sectional study was conducted from December 1st, 2012 to 31st, 2016 on uterine rupture. During the study selected 158 women were included by using exhaustive sampling method. Data were checked, coded and analyzed into STATA version 12. Chi-square test was used to identify the predictors of maternal and perinatal mortalities in women with uterine rupture and 95% Confidence Interval of odds ratio at p - value less than 0.05 was taken as a significance level. Results: The overall prevalence of uterine rupture was 0.49%. The average age of the patients was 29.5 ± 6.2 years and 71.52% of them were between 20 and 34 years old; more than 60% had a parity ≥4 (average parity: 4.7 ± 2.5). 81.17% of the cases had a fully ruptured uterus and 51.17% of the uterine ruptures were located in the lower segment. Repair of the pregnant ruptured uterus was performed in 93.04% of the cases and hysterectomy in 5.06%. Maternal and perinatal mortalities were 8.86% and 72.04% respectively. Regarding maternal mortality, no parameter showed a significant association with maternal death. As for perinatal mortality, parity ≥4, complete rupture and segmento-corporeal lesion were significantly associated with perinatal death (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Uterine rupture remains one of the causes of maternal and perinatal mortality in Lubumbashi. The place occupied by uterine ruptures in obstetric activity requires joint and urgent action by all stakeholders in the health system in order to combat this scourge, witness to poor quality obstetric care.
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General practitioners’ knowledge, attitudes and practices on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections in children in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo

Published on: 16th September, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8701522218

Objective: To assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices declared among general practitioners (GPs) concerning the use of antibiotics for the treatment of ARI in children under 5 years in Lubumbashi. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the level of knowledge, attitude and practices concerning antibiotic prescribing among 67 GPs working in the pediatric setting in various health structures in Lubumbashi city, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Data were collected from April 1st to June 30th, 2020. Results: GPs had limited knowledge about antibiotic prescriptions (mean of 46% correct answers to 8 questions). Although they are generally concerned about antibiotic resistance (mean ± SD = 0.50 ± 0.68), and are unwilling to submit to pressure to prescribe antibiotics to meet patient demands and expectations (mean ± SD = –1.78 ± 0.31) and the requirements to prescribe antibiotics for fear of losing patients (mean ± SD = –1.67 ± 0.47), there was a lack of motivation to change prescribing practices (mean ± SD = −0.37 ± 0.94) and strong agreement that they themselves should take responsibility for tackling antibiotic resistance (mean ± SD = 1.24 ± 0.74). Multiple linear regression results showed that higher knowledge scores were associated with less avoidance of responsibility when prescribing antibiotics (β = 0.919; p = 0.000). Conclusion: To curb the over-prescription of antibiotics, it is not enough to improve knowledge in itself. The lack of motivation of physicians to change must be addressed through a systematic approach. These data show the need for interventions that support the rational prescribing of antibiotics.
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The practice of self-medication in children by their mothers in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo

Published on: 17th July, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8658074907

Self-medication is a common practice in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). There are few studies on mothers’ practice of self-medication in children in DRC. Trying to draw an inventory of this practice, we carried out a survey of self-medication of children under 12 years of age by their mothers (n = 392) in Lubumbashi, DRC. The main objective was to assess frequency of self-medication and the secondary purposes were to describe habits, dangerous behaviors and common mistakes. The results speak for themselves: 96% of the mothers self-medicate their children; 95.7% do not know the exact dosage of the drug used; 97.17% do not check the expiry date; over 91% of the mothers use antimalarials, 41.3% antipyretics/analgesics and 26.3% antibiotics. Healthcare practitioners should involve household members in focused awareness on self-medication and its negative implications in order to encourage them to serve as change agents against the practice by mothers.
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Predictors of mortality in neonatal sepsis in a resource-limited setting

Published on: 16th June, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9272394428

Introduction: Sepsis remains a major cause of death in neonatal period. Although significant advances in diagnosis, therapeutic and prevention strategies have been noted, sepsis remains a common concern in clinical practice especially in low-resource countries. The aim of this study was to determine the predictors of mortality in neonatal sepsis in Lubumbashi city (Democratic Republic of Congo). Methods: The records of newborns with sepsis managed in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in two University Hospitals between November 2019 and October 2020 were studied. Binary and multiple logistic regressions have been used to observe the association between independent variables and dependent variable. Results: A total of 162 cases of neonatal sepsis were reviewed. The mortality rate of neonatal sepsis was 21% of babies admitted. Very low birth weight (< 1500 grams) and primiparity were significantly associated with mortality in neonatal sepsis (AOR = 12.66; 95% CI 2.40 to 66.86; p = 0.003 and AOR = 3.35; 95% Cl 1.31 to 8.59; p = 0.012, respectively). Conclusion: The mortality rate of neonatal sepsis was 21%. Very low birth weight and primiparity were significantly associated with mortality in neonatal sepsis.
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Visual evoked potentials: Normative values from healthy Senegalese adults

Published on: 11th August, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8652203971

Introduction: Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) are potential differences recorded on the scalp in response to visual stimulation. They are obtained with slowly repeated stimuli. The aim of this study was to determine the normative values of the visual evoked potentials in our setting. Methodology: We conducted a cross-sectional study from February 1 to April 30, 2019 at the Clinical Neurophysiology laboratory of the I.P. Ndiaye Clinic at CHNU Fann in Dakar (Senegal). Results: We found that men had high averages of N75, P100 and N145 wave latencies and low averages of P100 wave amplitude (p>0.05). However, neither age nor body mass index influenced the parameters of VEPs. Conclusion: Sex is important physiological variable in establishing laboratory normative values for VEPs. There is a marked difference between the sexes for the VEPs parameters.
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Epilepsy due to Neurocysticercosis: Analysis of a Hospital Cohort

Published on: 24th September, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8799421474

Introduction: Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a common helminthic infection of the nervous system that occurs when humans become intermediate hosts in the life cycle of the pig tapeworm (Taenia solium) after ingesting its eggs. The objective of this study was to analyze socio-demographic, clinical and paraclinical features of patients with NCC in Lubumbashi, DRC. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted over a period of 2 years within the Neuropsychiatric Center of Lubumbashi. Socio-demographic, clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic features were studied. Results: A total of 18 patients with NCC were listed. Epilepsy was found in 72.2% (13/18) of the cases. The mean age of the patients was 30.2 ± 13.5 years; males accounted for 61.2% of the cases. 84.6% were consumers of pork. Generalized epilepsy was found in 84.6% of the cases and hypereosinophilia in 38% of the cases. On the neuroimaging, the parietal location of lesions represented 92.3%; calcifications were the type of lesion in 53.8% of the cases and 69.2% of the cases presented lesions in the 4th evolutionary stage. Electroencephalogram was normal in 84.4% of the cases. Phenobarbital was the antiepileptic drug used in 69.3%; albendazole and prednisone were used in 53.9% of the cases. Conclusion: This study shows that NCC is one of the causes of epilepsy in Lubumbashi. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures are the most common form of presentation and calcified parenchymal lesions are the most common radiological feature of NCC. So, any patient with acute onset of afebrile seizure should be screened for NCC provided other common causes been ruled out.
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Using the DFConhecimento instrument to assess Congolese healthcare professionals’ knowledge on sickle cell disease

Published on: 29th September, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9278289343

Introduction: Despite advances in the management of sickle cell disease (SCD), gaps still exist in the knowledge of healthcare professionals (HCPs) about the disease. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of HCPs about SCD. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study involving 465 HCPs (physicians and nurses) who responded to the DFConhecimento instrument questionnaire. Performance was tested in terms of average score and proportion of correct response for each questionnaire item topic. Results: The average score for respondents was 4.6 ± 1.9 out of a total of 13 points. Proportions of professionals who responded well were greater than 58% in three topics (Neonatal screening program, Sickle cell conditions, and Sickle cell anemia genotype). In the other topics, rates of good response ranged from 11.6% to 46.0%. There was a statistical association between best performance and medical title: physicians were more knowledgeable than nurses (OR = 6.26; 95% CI: 2.69-14.56). Conclusion: This study highlighted that knowledge of SCD among HCPs is very inadequate. This lack of sufficient information on SCD from HCPs indicates the need to develop continuing education programs.
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Assessment of knowledge of acute kidney injury among non-nephrology healthcare workers in North-Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Published on: 6th April, 2022

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9470693131

Background: Assessment of knowledge of acute kidney injury (AKI) among healthcare workers (HCWs) is necessary to identify areas of deficiency and key topics to focus on while organizing educational programs to improve AKI care. The objective of this study was to assess AKI knowledge and practice among health care providers in North Kivu province, the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Material and methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in six public hospitals in North Kivu province using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: A total of 158 HCWs completed the survey, among them 66 (41.78%) were physicians. The mean age of respondents was 36.07 ± 10.16 years and the male gender was 56.33%. Only 12 (7.59%) of the respondents had a good knowledge of the definition and classification of AKI. The respondents’ mean scores were 6.76 out of a total of 18 about risk factors for AKI and 6.29 out of a total of 11 with regard to nephrotoxic drugs. Regarding practices, 28.48% of the respondents assess the risk of AKI in their patients in their daily practices; 31.65% report AKI in the patients’ medical history, and 33.54% call on a nephrologist specialist to get specialized advice. Conclusion: This study found considerable gaps in knowledge and practice regarding AKI among most of HCWs in North Kivu province. 
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